ICAM 130/VIS 149 – Seminar in Contemporary Computer Topics

ICAM 130/VIS 149 – Seminar in Contemporary Computer Topics,   AKA Lev Manovich's usual Seminar



Instructor Contact Information:
Jeff Knowlton 661-555-1212
***** This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
skype name: j****nowlton


Office Hours: Thurs 11:30pm- 12:30pm
Office: VAF 308 (meeting at Roma mostly)

Meeting Time: Thurs12:30pm - 3:320pm
Course Prerequisites: VIS 140/ICAM 101; VIS 145A/ICAM 102 recommended.
               NOTE: Materials fee required.

Text:
Snow Crash
Neal Stephenson
ISBN-10: 0553380958  Spectra (May 2, 2000)

Neuromancer
William Gibson
ISBN-10: 0441012035  Ace Hardcover; 20th Annual edition (November 2, 2004)

The Architecture of Intelligence (The Information Technology Revolution in Architecture)
Derrick de Kerckhove
ISBN-10: 3764364513    Birkhäuser Basel; 1 edition (June 5, 2001)

HyperArchitecture: Spaces in the Electronic Age (The Information Technology Revolution in Architecture)
Luigi Prestinenza Puglisi
ISBN-10: 3764360933  Birkhäuser Basel; 1 edition (August 1, 1999)

Narrative Archaeology
Jeremy Hight

Beyond Locative Media
Marc Tutors

HyperBodies
Kas Oosterhuis
ISBN-10: 3764369698   Birkhäuser Basel; 1 edition (August 25, 2003) 

Collective Intelligence in Design (Architectural Design)
Christopher Hight (Editor), Chris Perry (Editor)
ISBN-10: 0470026529   Academy Press; 1 edition (December 11, 2006)
 

What Ever Happened to Urbanism?
Rem Koolhaas 

The Sand Castles 
WIDE ANGLE PBS

Constructions (Writing Architecture)
John Rajchman
ISBN-10: 0262680963  The MIT Press (February 6, 1998)

Earth Moves: The Furnishing of Territories (Writing Architecture) 
Bernard Cache
ISBN-10: 0262531305  The MIT Press (October 5, 1995)

 

Course Description:
As soon as artists began to use the computer in the 1980's, they sought to dematerialize the physical and work within pure data, trading the real world or meat space for the "consensual hallucination " of cyberspace , the virtual world. In this course we will make connections  between Computational Architecture and Locative Media as strategy to reverse the process, bringing the virtual into the real world or allowing the user to occupy both positions simultaneously.

This course will consist of weekly readings and presentations by students as well as a midTerm presentation and a Final Essay.

Attendance Policy:    
You are permitted one unexcused absence from a lecture. Beyond that, you are required to provide a doctor's note or other acceptable written excuse. You are expected to attend. If you are presenting and are for some reason, unable to attend, it is up to you to find another student to switch presentations with.

Student Conduct Policy:

Please refer to the school's student conduct policy.

Student Evaluation/Methods of Assessment:


Grading is based on:

1) Participation and weekly presentations- 20%
2) MidTerm Presentation - 40%
3) Final Essay - 40%
Class Participation:

This grade is dependent on discussions, preparedness and methodical inquiry. Required assignments are:

01. Student presentations on required readings. . (1 each)
02. Completing weekly class readings.
03. Participate in class discussions on readings.
Each student is required to give a presentation to fulfill the primary portion of the participation grade.

A. An oral presentation of major points of your assigned articles/readings.

Who was the main proponent?
When did this idea take hold?
How do we see its impact today?
Where was it focused?
How did it change the existing standard?

B. Presentation must include:

1. An outline of the major points of the articles/readings
2. One paragraph summarizing presentation. (Note: present three major ideas behind your subject)
3. Include supplementary graphic examples


Grading Criteria for written work:

A = Excellent. Your paper will be turned in on time and:

Have a strong thesis (main point) that is clearly supported by an organized paper.
Provide excellent examples to support your thesis.
Show thorough comprehension of the ideas presented.
Have strong analysis of material and arguments.
Demonstrate your ability to go beyond ideas presented in class and in the reading.
Be written clearly, with virtually no errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation or usage.
Include a bibliography and all necessary citations required by the assignment.

B = Very Good. Your paper will be turned in on time and:

Have a good thesis that is supported by a mostly organized paper.
Provide good examples to support your ideas.
Show thorough comprehension of the ideas presented.
Analyze material and arguments.
Be written clearly, with few errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation or usage.
Include a bibliography and all necessary citations if required by the assignment.

C = Good/Average. Your paper will be turned in on time and:

Have a thesis, perhaps flawed or one that is incompletely supported by the paper.
Show a few flaws in organization.
Provide average examples to support your thesis.
Show minor limitations to comprehension of the ideas presented.
Analyze, with minor errors, material and arguments.
Be written clearly, with some errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation or usage.
Include a bibliography and all necessary citations required by the assignment.

D = Below average, barely passing. Your paper will be turned in on time and
      have one or more of the following major problems:

A weak thesis, or one that is incompletely supported by the paper.
Incomplete or weak organization or some lack of coherence.
Weak or poorly used examples.
Show only basic comprehension of the ideas presented.
Analyze, partially or with some errors, material and arguments.
Be compromised by too many errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation or usage.
Lacks a bibliography and complete citations required by the assignment.

F = Failing. Your paper will receive an F if it meets ANY of the criteria below:

Does not meet the minimum requirements for a D.
Shows evidence of plagiarism.
Does not fulfill the requirements of the assignment.
Is obviously a first draft.
Lacks a bibliography and complete citations required by the assignment.


Required:
1. Read all class assignments and understand the major concepts of the readings.
2. Turn in all preliminary outlines two weeks before your paper is due.
3. Prepare papers in advance to clean up final drafts.
4. All papers should have full bibliographies and be cited properly.
   Wikipedia is not an acceptable source.
5. Follow all assigned instructions.
6. Ask me for help if you have any questions.


Standard Content Disclaimer:
Some of the material we will cover may push some boundaries. Art is supposed to do that. If you feel that your boundaries have been breached, try to stick it out and see where things are going. If you need to leave the room, please write a one page paper explaining your reaction to the material.

Weekly Outline:


Week 1, Oct 2: House keeping.

Review class procedures and requirements. Intro to basic ideas, Computational Architecture, Locative Media and so on. Authenticate email addresses.  

Week 2, Oct 9:
Virtuality 
Discuss readings. Snow Crash, Neuromancer and the Architecture of Intelligence. Two students will present the readings from the first texts.
Neuromancer p.43-58, Snow Crash p.19-27

Week 3, Oct 16: Space is the Place....and so is Subspace
Discuss readings. Spaces in the Electronic Age, Two students will present the readings from the texts. Look at the work of Usman Haque.

Week 4, Oct 23: Locative Media and Locative Technologies
Discuss readings. Drew Hemmet, Jeremy Hight and Marc Tutors. Two students will present the readings from the texts. Examine WiFi, UWB, RFID, GPS, IR, Bluetooth.

Week 5, Oct 30: Midterm Presentations and Evaluations.
Don't panic! Be prepared, know your material and everything will go well.

Week 6, Nov 6: The CPU, The Body, The City
Discuss readings. HyperBodies. Two students will present the readings from the texts.

Week 7, Nov 13 Collective Intelligence and Emergence

Begin Planning for the Final Essay. Need help or a direction? Discuss readings. Collective Intelligence. Two students will present the readings from the texts.

Week 8, Nov 20:. Urban Mapping
Discuss readings. Something by Rem Kohlhaus. Two students will present the readings from the texts. View the documentary "The Sand Castles "

Week 9, Nov 27: The Fold, John Rajchman, Giles Deleuze and Bernard Cache

Discuss readings.Two students will present the readings from the texts.

Week 10, Dec 4: Wild West Days
Have you really read this far down? This date is wide open. We will come up with a lecture based on what your interests in the class have been. What do we want to explore? Discuss readings. Two students will present the readings from the texts.

Week 11, Dec 11 Final week:

Papers due. Plan ahead. Have someone else read your paper. Bribe them if you have to, but get some help revealing your blind spots.